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把下面内容存为rippled.cfg
<file ini>
#----
#

  1. Rippled Server Instance Configuration Example
    #
    #----
    #
  2. Contents
    #
  3. 1. Peer Networking
    #
  4. 2. Websocket Networking
    #
  5. 3. RPC Networking
    #
  6. 4. SMS Gateway
    #
  7. 5. Ripple Protcol
    #
  8. 6. HTTPS Client
    #
  9. 7. Database
    #
  10. 8. Diagnostics
    #
  11. 9. Voting
    #
    #----
    #
  12. Purpose
    #
  13. This file documents and provides examples of all rippled server process
  14. configuration options. When the rippled server instance is launched, it
  15. looks for a file with the following name:
    #
  16. rippled.cfg
    #
  17. For more information on where the rippled server instance searches for
  18. the file please visit the Ripple wiki. Specifically, the section explaining
  19. the --conf command line option:
    #
  20. https://ripple.com/wiki/Rippled#--conf.3Dpath
    #
  21. This file should be named rippled.cfg. This file is UTF-8 with Dos, UNIX,
  22. or Mac style end of lines. Blank lines and lines beginning with '#' are
  23. ignored. Undefined sections are reserved. No escapes are currently defined.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  24. 1. Peer Networking
    #
    #----
    #
  25. These settings control security and access attributes of the Peer to Peer
  26. server section of the rippled process. Peer Networking implements the
  27. Ripple Payment protocol. It is over peer connections that transactions
  28. and validations are passed from to machine to machine, to make up the
  29. components of closed ledgers.
    #
    #
    #

  30. [ips]
    #


  31. List of hostnames or ips where the Ripple protocol is served. For a starter
  32. list, you can either copy entries from: https://ripple.com/ripple.txt or if
  33. you prefer you can specify r.ripple.com 51235
    #
  34. One IPv4 address or domain names per line is allowed. A port may optionally
  35. be specified after adding a space to the address. By convention, if known,
  36. IPs are listed in from most to least trusted.
    #
  37. Examples:
  38. 192.168.0.1
  39. 192.168.0.1 3939
  40. r.ripple.com 51235
    #
  41. This will give you a good, up-to-date list of addresses:
    #

  42. [ips]


  43. r.ripple.com 51235
    #
    #
    #

  44. [ips_fixed]
    #


  45. List of IP addresses or hostnames to which rippled should always attempt to
  46. maintain peer connections with. This is useful for manually forming private
  47. networks, for example to configure a validation server that connects to the
  48. Ripple network through a public-facing server, or for building a set
  49. of cluster peers.
    #
  50. One IPv4 address or domain names per line is allowed. A port may optionally
  51. be specified after adding a space to the address.
    #
    #
    #

  52. [peer_ip]
    #


  53. IP address or domain to bind to allow external connections from peers.
  54. Defaults to not binding, which disallows external connections from peers.
    #
  55. Examples: 0.0.0.0 - Bind on all interfaces.
    #
    #
    #

  56. [peer_port]
    #


  57. If peer_ip is supplied, corresponding port to bind to for peer connections.
    #
    #
    #

  58. [peer_port_proxy]
    #


  59. An optional, additional listening port number for peers. Incoming
  60. connections on this port will be required to provide a PROXY Protocol
  61. handshake, described in this document (external link):
    #
  62. http://haproxy.1wt.eu/download/1.5/doc/proxy-protocol.txt
  63. The PROXY Protocol is a popular method used by elastic load balancing
  64. service providers such as Amazon, to identify the true IP address and
  65. port number of external incoming connections.
    #
  66. In addition to enabling this setting, it will also be required to
  67. use your provider-specific control panel or administrative web page
  68. to configure your server instance to receive PROXY Protocol handshakes,
  69. and also to restrict access to your instance to the Elastic Load Balancer.
    #
    #
    #

  70. [peer_private]
    #


  71. 0 or 1.
    #

  72. 0: Request peers to broadcast your address. Normal outbound peer connections [default]


  73. 1: Request peers not broadcast your address. Only connect to configured peers.
    #
    #
    #

  74. [peers_max]
    #


  75. The largest number of desired peer connections (incoming or outgoing).
  76. Cluster and fixed peers do not count towards this total. There are
  77. implementation-defined lower limits imposed on this value for security
  78. purposes.
    #
    #
    #

  79. [peer_ssl_cipher_list]
    #


  80. A colon delimited string with the allowed SSL cipher modes for peer. The
  81. choices for for ciphers are defined by the OpenSSL API function
  82. SSL_CTX_set_cipher_list, documented here (external link):
    #
  83. http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/tpfhelp/current/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.ztpf-ztpfdf.doc_put.cur%2Fgtpc2%2Fcpp_ssl_ctx_set_cipher_list.html
    #
  84. The default setting is "ALL:!LOW:!EXP:!MD5:@STRENGTH", which allows
  85. non-authenticated peer connections (they are, however, secure).
    #
    #
    #

  86. [node_seed]
    #


  87. This is used for clustering. To force a particular node seed or key, the
  88. key can be set here. The format is the same as the validation_seed field.
  89. To obtain a validation seed, use the validation_create command.
    #
  90. Examples: RASH BUSH MILK LOOK BAD BRIM AVID GAFF BAIT ROT POD LOVE
  91. shfArahZT9Q9ckTf3s1psJ7C7qzVN
    #
    #
    #

  92. [cluster_nodes]
    #


  93. To extend full trust to other nodes, place their node public keys here.
  94. Generally, you should only do this for nodes under common administration.
  95. Node public keys start with an 'n'. To give a node a name for identification
  96. place a space after the public key and then the name.
    #
    #
    #

  97. [sntp_servers]
    #


  98. IP address or domain of NTP servers to use for time synchronization.
    #
  99. These NTP servers are suitable for rippled servers located in the United
  100. States:
  101. time.windows.com
  102. time.apple.com
  103. time.nist.gov
  104. pool.ntp.org
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  105. 2. Websocket Networking
    #
    #----
    #
  106. These settings control security and access attributes of the Websocket
  107. server section of the rippled process, primarily used to service
  108. client requests and backend applications.
    #
    #
    #

  109. [websocket_public_ip]
    #


  110. IP address or domain to bind to allow untrusted connections from clients.
  111. In the future, this option will go away and the peer_ip will accept
  112. websocket client connections.
    #
  113. Examples: 0.0.0.0 - Bind on all interfaces.
  114. 127.0.0.1 - Bind on localhost interface. Only local programs may connect.
    #
    #
    #

  115. [websocket_public_port]
    #


  116. Port to bind to allow untrusted connections from clients. In the future,
  117. this option will go away and the peer_ip will accept websocket client
  118. connections.
    #
    #
    #

  119. [websocket_public_secure]
    #


  120. 0, 1 or 2.
  121. 0: Provide ws service for websocket_public_ip/websocket_public_port.

  122. 1: Provide both ws and wss service for websocket_public_ip/websocket_public_port. [default]


  123. 2: Provide wss service only for websocket_public_ip/websocket_public_port.
    #
  124. Browser pages like the Ripple client will not be able to connect to a secure
  125. websocket connection if a self-signed certificate is used. As the Ripple
  126. reference client currently shares secrets with its server, this should be
  127. enabled.
    #
    #
    #

  128. [websocket_ping_frequency]
    #


  129. <number>
    #
  130. The amount of time to wait in seconds, before sending a websocket 'ping'
  131. message. Ping messages are used to determine if the remote end of the
  132. connection is no longer available.
  133. #
    #

  134. [websocket_ip]
    #


  135. IP address or domain to bind to allow trusted ADMIN connections from backend
  136. applications.
    #
  137. Examples: 0.0.0.0 - Bind on all interfaces.
  138. 127.0.0.1 - Bind on localhost interface. Only local programs may connect.
    #
    #
    #

  139. [websocket_port]
    #


  140. Port to bind to allow trusted ADMIN connections from backend applications.
    #
    #
    #

  141. [websocket_secure]
    #


  142. 0, 1, or 2.

  143. 0: Provide ws service only for websocket_ip/websocket_port. [default]


  144. 1: Provide ws and wss service for websocket_ip/websocket_port
  145. 2: Provide wss service for websocket_ip/websocket_port.
    #
    #
    #

  146. [websocket_ssl_cert]
    #


  147. Specify the path to the SSL certificate file in PEM format.
  148. This is not needed if the chain includes it.
    #
    #
    #

  149. [websocket_ssl_chain]
    #


  150. If you need a certificate chain, specify the path to the certificate chain
  151. here. The chain may include the end certificate.
    #
    #
    #

  152. [websocket_ssl_key]
    #


  153. Specify the filename holding the SSL key in PEM format.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  154. 3. RPC Networking
    #
    #----
    #
  155. This group of settings configures security and access attributes of the
  156. RPC server section of the rippled process, used to service both local
  157. and optional remote clients.
    #
    #
    #

  158. [rpc_allow_remote]
    #


  159. 0 or 1.
    #

  160. 0: Allow RPC connections only from 127.0.0.1. [default]


  161. 1: Allow RPC connections from any IP.
    #
    #
    #

  162. [rpc_admin_allow]
    #


  163. Specify a list of IP addresses allowed to have admin access. One per line.
  164. If you want to test the output of non-admin commands add this section and
  165. just put an ip address not under your control.
  166. Defaults to 127.0.0.1.
    #
    #
    #

  167. [rpc_admin_user]
    #


  168. As a server, require this as the admin user to be specified. Also, require
  169. rpc_admin_user and rpc_admin_password to be checked for RPC admin functions.
  170. The request must specify these as the admin_user and admin_password in the
  171. request object.
    #
  172. As a client, supply this to the server in the request object.
    #
    #
    #

  173. [rpc_admin_password]
    #


  174. As a server, require this as the admin password to be specified. Also,
  175. require rpc_admin_user and rpc_admin_password to be checked for RPC admin
  176. functions. The request must specify these as the admin_user and
  177. admin_password in the request object.
    #
  178. As a client, supply this to the server in the request object.
    #
    #
    #

  179. [rpc_ip]
    #


  180. IP address or domain to bind to allow insecure RPC connections.
  181. Defaults to not binding, which disallows RPC connections.
    #
    #
    #

  182. [rpc_port]
    #


  183. If rpc_ip is supplied, corresponding port to bind to for peer connections.
    #
    #
    #

  184. [rpc_user]
    #


  185. As a server, require this user to be specified and require rpc_password to
  186. be checked for RPC access via the rpc_ip and rpc_port. The user and password
  187. must be specified via HTTP's basic authentication method.
  188. As a client, supply this to the server via HTTP's basic authentication
  189. method.
    #
    #
    #

  190. [rpc_password]
    #


  191. As a server, require this password to be specified and require rpc_user to
  192. be checked for RPC access via the rpc_ip and rpc_port. The user and password
  193. must be specified via HTTP's basic authentication method.
  194. As a client, supply this to the server via HTTP's basic authentication
  195. method.
    #
    #
    #

  196. [rpc_startup]
    #


  197. Specify a list of RPC commands to run at startup.
    #
  198. Examples:
  199. { "command" : "server_info" }
  200. { "command" : "log_level", "partition" : "ripplecalc", "severity" : "trace" }
    #
    #
    #

  201. [rpc_secure]
    #


  202. 0 or 1.
    #

  203. 0: Server certificates are not provided for RPC clients using SSL [default]


  204. 1: Client RPC connections wil be provided with SSL certificates.
    #
  205. Note that if rpc_secure is enabled, it will also be necessary to configure
  206. the certificate file settings located in rpc_ssl_cert, rpc_ssl_chain, and
  207. rpc_ssl_key
    #
    #
    #

  208. [rpc_ssl_cert]
    #


  209. <pathname>
    #
  210. A file system path leading to the SSL certificate file to use for secure
  211. RPC. The file is in PEM format. The file is not needed if the chain
  212. includes it.
    #
    #
    #

  213. [rpc_ssl_chain]
    #


  214. <pathname>
    #
  215. A file system path leading to the file with the certificate chain.
  216. The chain may include the end certificate.
    #
    #
    #

  217. [rpc_ssl_key]
    #


  218. <pathname>
    #
  219. A file system path leading to the file with the SSL key.
  220. The file is in PEM format.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  221. 4. SMS Gateway
    #
    #----
    #
  222. If you have a certain SMS messaging provider you can configure these
  223. settings to allow the rippled server instance to send an SMS text to the
  224. configured gateway in response to an admin-level RPC command "sms" with
  225. one parameter, 'text' containing the message to send. This allows backend
  226. applications to use the rippled instance to securely notify administrators
  227. of custom events or information via SMS gateway.
    #
  228. When the 'sms' RPC command is issued, the configured SMS gateway will be
  229. contacted via HTTPS GET at the URL indicated by sms_url. The URI formed
  230. will be in this format:
    #

  231. [sms_url]?from=[sms_from]&to=[sms_to]&api_key=[sms_key]&api_secret=[sms_secret]&text=['text']
    #



  232. Where [...] are the corresponding values from the configuration file, and



  233. ['test'] is the value of the JSON field with name 'text'.
    #



  234. [sms_url]
    #


  235. The URL to contact via HTTPS when sending SMS messages
    #

  236. [sms_from]



  237. [sms_to]



  238. [sms_key]



  239. [sms_secret]
    #


  240. These are all strings passed directly in the URI as query parameters
  241. to the provider of the SMS gateway.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  242. 5. Ripple Protocol
    #
    #----
    #
  243. These settings affect the behavior of the server instance with respect
  244. to Ripple payment protocol level activities such as validating and
  245. closing ledgers, establishing a quorum, or adjusting fees in response
  246. to server overloads.
    #
    #
    #

  247. [node_size]
    #


  248. Tunes the servers based on the expected load and available memory. Legal
  249. sizes are "tiny", "small", "medium", "large", and "huge". We recommend
  250. you start at the default and raise the setting if you have extra memory.
  251. The default is "tiny".
    #
    #
    #

  252. [validation_quorum]
    #


  253. Sets the minimum number of trusted validations a ledger must have before
  254. the server considers it fully validated. Note that if you are validating,

  255. your validation counts.
    #
    #
    #
    #[ledger_history]
    #256
    #


  256. The number of past ledgers to acquire on server startup and the minimum to
  257. maintain while running.
    #
  258. To serve clients, servers need historical ledger data. Servers that don't
  259. need to serve clients can set this to "none". Servers that want complete
  260. history can set this to "full".
    #
  261. The default is: 256
    #
    #
    #

  262. [fetch_depth]
    #


  263. The number of past ledgers to serve to other peers that request historical
  264. ledger data (or "full" for no limit).
    #
  265. Servers that require low latency and high local performance may wish to
  266. restrict the historical ledgers they are willing to serve. Setting this
  267. below 32 can harm network stability as servers require easy access to
  268. recent history to stay in sync. Values below 128 are not recommended.
    #
  269. The default is: full
    #
    #
    #

  270. [validation_seed]
    #


  271. To perform validation, this section should contain either a validation seed
  272. or key. The validation seed is used to generate the validation
  273. public/private key pair. To obtain a validation seed, use the
  274. validation_create command.
    #
  275. Examples: RASH BUSH MILK LOOK BAD BRIM AVID GAFF BAIT ROT POD LOVE
  276. shfArahZT9Q9ckTf3s1psJ7C7qzVN
    #
    #
    #

  277. [validators]
    #


  278. List of nodes to always accept as validators. Nodes are specified by domain
  279. or public key.
    #
  280. For domains, rippled will probe for https web servers at the specified
  281. domain in the following order: ripple.DOMAIN, www.DOMAIN, DOMAIN
    #
  282. For public key entries, a comment may optionally be specified after adding
  283. a space to the public key.
    #
  284. Examples:
  285. ripple.com
  286. n9KorY8QtTdRx7TVDpwnG9NvyxsDwHUKUEeDLY3AkiGncVaSXZi5
  287. n9MqiExBcoG19UXwoLjBJnhsxEhAZMuWwJDRdkyDz1EkEkwzQTNt John Doe
    #
    #
    #

  288. [validators_file]
    #


  289. Path to file contain a list of nodes to always accept as validators. Use
  290. this to specify a file other than this file to manage your validators list.
    #
  291. If this entry is not present or empty and no nodes from previous runs were
  292. found in the database, rippled will look for a validators.txt in the config
  293. directory. If not found there, it will attempt to retrieve the file from

  294. the [validators_site] web site.
    #



  295. After specifying a different [validators_file] or changing the contents of


  296. the validators file, issue a RPC unl_load command to have rippled load the
  297. file.
    #
  298. Specify the file by specifying its full path.
    #
  299. Examples:
  300. C:/home/johndoe/ripple/validators.txt
  301. /home/johndoe/ripple/validators.txt
    #
    #
    #

  302. [validators_site]
    #


  303. Specifies where to find validators.txt for UNL boostrapping and RPC
  304. unl_network command.
    #
  305. Example: ripple.com
    #
    #
    #

  306. [path_search]


  307. When searching for paths, the default search aggressiveness. This can take
  308. exponentially more resources as the size is increased.
    #
  309. The default is: 7
    #

  310. [path_search_fast]



  311. [path_search_max]


  312. When searching for paths, the minimum and maximum search aggressiveness.
    #
  313. The default for 'path_search_fast' is 2. The default for 'path_search_max' is 10.
    #

  314. [path_search_old]
    #


  315. For clients that use the legacy path finding interfaces, the search
  316. agressivness to use. The default is 7.
    #
    #
    #

  317. [fee_default]
    #


  318. Sets the base cost of a transaction in drops. Used when the server has
  319. no other source of fee information, such as signing transactions offline.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  320. 6. HTTPS Client
    #
    #----
    #
  321. The rippled server instance uses HTTPS GET requests in a variety of
  322. circumstances, including but not limited to the SMS Messaging Gateway
  323. feature and also for contacting trusted domains to fetch information
  324. such as mapping an email address to a Ripple Payment Network address.
    #

  325. [ssl_verify]
    #


  326. 0 or 1.
    #
  327. 0. HTTPS client connections will not verify certificates.
  328. 1. Certificates will be checked for HTTPS client connections .
    #
    #
    #

  329. [ssl_verify_file]
    #


  330. <pathname>
    #
  331. A file system path leading to the certificate verification file for
  332. HTTPS client requests.
    #
    #
    #

  333. [ssl_verify_dir]
    #


  334. <pathname>
    #
    #
  335. A file system path leading to a file or directory containing the root
  336. certificates that the server will accept for verifying HTTP servers.
  337. Used only for outbound HTTPS client connections.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  338. 7. Database
    #
    #----
    #
  339. rippled creates 4 SQLite database to hold bookkeeping information
  340. about transactions, local credentials, and various other things.
  341. It also creates the NodeDB, which holds all the objects that
  342. make up the current and historical ledgers. The size of the NodeDB
  343. grows in proportion to the amount of new data and the amount of
  344. historical data (a configurable setting).
    #
  345. The performance of the underlying storage media where the NodeDB
  346. is placed can affect the performance of the server. Some virtual
  347. hosting providers offer high speed secondary storage, with the
  348. caveat that the data is not persisted across launches. If rippled
  349. runs in such an environment, it can be beneficial to configure the
  350. temp_db setting, which activates a secondary "look-aside" cache
  351. that can speed up the server. Some testing is suggested to determine
  352. if the temp_db setting is an improvement for your environment
    #
  353. Partial pathnames will be considered relative to the location of
  354. the rippled.cfg file.
    #

  355. [node_db] Settings for the NodeDB (required)



  356. [temp_db] Settings for the look-aside temporary db (optional)



  357. [import_db] Settings for performing a one-time import (optional)
    #


  358. Format (without spaces):
  359. One or more lines of key / value pairs:
  360. <key> '=' <value>
  361. ...
    #
  362. Examples:
  363. type=HyperLevelDB
  364. path=db/hyperldb
  365. compression=0
    #
  366. Choices for 'type' (not case-sensitive)
  367. RocksDB Use Facebook's RocksDB database (preferred)
  368. HyperLevelDB Use an improved version of LevelDB
  369. SQLite Use SQLite
  370. LevelDB Use Google's LevelDB database (deprecated)
  371. none Use no backend
    #
  372. Required keys:
  373. path Location to store the database (all types)
    #
  374. Optional keys:
  375. compression 0 for none, 1 for Snappy compression
    #
  376. Notes:
  377. The 'node_db' entry configures the primary, persistent storage.
    #
  378. The 'temp_db' configures a look-aside cache for high volume storage
  379. which doesn't necessarily persist between server launches. This
  380. is an optional configuration parameter. If it is left out then
  381. no look-aside database is created or used.
    #
  382. The 'import_db' is used with the '--import' command line option to
  383. migrate the specified database into the current database given

  384. in the [node_db] section.
    #



  385. [database_path] Path to the book-keeping databases.
    #


  386. There are 4 book-keeping SQLite database that the server creates and
  387. maintains. If you omit this configuration setting, it will default to
  388. creating a directory called "db" located in the same place as your
  389. rippled.cfg file.
    #
    #
    #
    #----
    #
  390. 8. Diagnostics
    #
    #----
    #
  391. These settings are designed to help server administrators diagnose
  392. problems, and obtain detailed information about the activities being
  393. performed by the rippled process.
    #
    #
    #

  394. [debug_logfile]
    #


  395. Specifies were a debug logfile is kept. By default, no debug log is kept.
  396. Unless absolute, the path is relative the directory containing this file.
    #
  397. Example: debug.log
    #
    #
    #

  398. [insight]
    #


  399. Configuration parameters for the Beast.Insight stats collection module.
    #
  400. Insight is a module that collects information from the areas of rippled
  401. that have instrumentation. The configuration paramters control where the
  402. collection metrics are sent. The parameters are expressed as key = value
  403. pairs with no white space. The main parameter is the choice of server:
    #
  404. "server"
    #
  405. Choice of server to send metrics to. Currently the only choice is
  406. "statsd" which sends UDP packets to a StatsD daemon, which must be
  407. running while rippled is running. More information on StatsD is
  408. available here:
  409. https://github.com/b/statsd_spec
    #
  410. When server=statsd, these additional keys are used:
    #
  411. "address" The UDP address and port of the listening StatsD server,
  412. in the format, n.n.n.n:port.
    #
  413. "prefix" A string prepended to each collected metric. This is used
  414. to distinguish between different running instances of rippled.
    #
  415. If this section is missing, or the server type is unspecified or unknown,
  416. statistics are not collected or reported.
    #
  417. Example:
    #

  418. [insight]


  419. server=statsd
  420. address=192.168.0.95:4201
  421. prefix=my_validator
  422. #----
    #
  423. 9. Voting
    #
    #----
    #
  424. The vote settings configure settings for the entire Ripple network.
  425. While a single instance of rippled cannot unilaterally enforce network-wide
  426. settings, these choices become part of the instance's vote during the
  427. consensus process for each voting ledger.
    #

  428. [voting]
    #


  429. A set of key/value pair parameters used during voting ledgers.
    #
  430. reference_fee = <drops>
    #
  431. The cost of the reference transaction fee, specified in drops.
  432. The reference transaction is the simplest form of transaction.
  433. It represents an XRP payment between two parties.
    #
  434. If this parameter is unspecified, rippled will use an internal
  435. default. Don't change this without understanding the consequences.
    #
  436. Example:
  437. reference_fee = 10 # 10 drops
  438. account_reserve = <drops>
    #
  439. The account reserve requirement specified in drops. The portion of an
  440. account's XRP balance that is at or below the reserve may only be
  441. spent on transaction fees, and not transferred out of the account.
    #
  442. If this parameter is unspecified, rippled will use an internal
  443. default. Don't change this without understanding the consequences.
    #
  444. Example:
  445. account_reserve = 20000000 # 20 XRP
    #
  446. owner_reserve = <drops>
    #
  447. The owner reserve is the amount of XRP reserved in the account for
  448. each ledger item owned by the account. Ledger items an account may
  449. own include trust lines, open orders, and tickets.
    #
  450. If this parameter is unspecified, rippled will use an internal
  451. default. Don't change this without understanding the consequences.
    #
  452. Example:
  453. owner_reserve = 5000000 # 5 XRP
    #
    #----

  1. Allow other peers to connect to this server.
    #
    [peer_ip]
    0.0.0.0




[peer_port]
51235




  1. Allow untrusted clients to connect to this server.
    #
    [websocket_public_ip]
    0.0.0.0




[websocket_public_port]
5006




  1. Provide trusted websocket ADMIN access to the localhost.
    #
    [websocket_ip]
    127.0.0.1




[websocket_port]
6006




  1. Provide trusted json-rpc ADMIN access to the localhost.
    #
    [rpc_ip]
    127.0.0.1




[rpc_port]
5005





[rpc_allow_remote]
0





[node_size]
medium



  1. This is primary persistent datastore for rippled. This includes transaction
  2. metadata, account states, and ledger headers. Helpful information can be
  3. found here: https://ripple.com/wiki/NodeBackEnd



[node_db]
type=RocksDB
path=/opt/ripple/public/db/rocksdb
open_files=2000
filter_bits=12
cache_mb=256
file_size_mb=8
file_size_mult=2





[database_path]
/opt/ripple/public/db



  1. This needs to be an absolute directory reference, not a relative one.
  2. Modify this value as required.



[debug_logfile]
/opt/ripple/public/debug.log





[sntp_servers]
time.windows.com
time.apple.com
time.nist.gov
pool.ntp.org




  1. Where to find some other servers speaking the Ripple protocol.
    #
    [ips]
    r.ripple.com 51235


  1. The latest validators can be obtained from

  2. https://ripple.com/ripple.txt
    #
    [validators]
    n949f75evCHwgyP4fPVgaHqNHxUVN15PsJEZ3B3HnXPcPjcZAoy7 RL1
    n9MD5h24qrQqiyBC8aeqqCWvpiBiYQ3jxSr91uiDvmrkyHRdYLUj RL2
    n9L81uNCaPgtUJfaHh89gmdvXKAmSt5Gdsw2g1iPWaPkAHW5Nm4C RL3
    n9KiYM9CgngLvtRCQHZwgC2gjpdaZcCcbt3VboxiNFcKuwFVujzS RL4
    n9LdgEtkmGB9E2h3K4Vp7iGUaKuq23Zr32ehxiU8FWY7xoxbWTSA RL5


  1. Ditto.



[validation_quorum]
3



  1. Turn down default logging to save disk space in the long run.
  2. Valid values here are trace, debug, info, warning, error, and fatal



[rpc_startup]
{ "command": "log_level", "severity": "warning" }



  1. Configure SSL for WebSockets. Not enabled by default because not everybody
  2. has an SSL cert on their server, but if you uncomment the following lines and
  3. set the path to the SSL certificate and private key the WebSockets protocol

  4. will be protected by SSL/TLS.
    #[websocket_secure]
    #1




#[websocket_ssl_cert]
#/etc/ssl/certs/server.crt





#[websocket_ssl_key]
#/etc/ssl/private/server.key



  1. Defaults to 0 ("no") so that you can use self-signed SSL certificates for

  2. development, or internally.
    #[ssl_verify]
    #0


</file>

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